image its-salah replied to your post: lol Egypt is screwed ^_^

Whats bad about Mursi? Idk much I just know numerous times it’s been told both candidates suck.

yeah basically they both suck. 

There to angles i hate about Mursi. First he belongs to the “Muslim Brotherhood”, which is super hypocritical. In numerous occasions they proved that. When our previous president, Mohamed Hosni Mobarak, was still in power and the revolution of 25 January started, they were 100% against the revolution. Then when Mobarak fell from his reign, they suddenly support the revolution. They divide the people to Muslims and Disbelievers. they have little tolerance, and regard anyone, even other Muslims, as Disbelievers if they disagree with them. They want to turn Egypt into an “Islamic State” and they only take the surface of Islam. They want the women to cover, men to grow beards, and people who steal to have their hands cut. That is not how Islam works. They preach about peace & Islam, yet they do the opposite. They blindly follow their leaders and defend them without basis. Like for example, when people were electing for this presidential elections, a lot of the members of the Muslim Brotherhood went to villages and threatened the Christians who were a majority in such areas that not to leave their homes for voting , that is why in such places nobody voted. I could go on forever why the Muslim Brotherhood are hypocrites and not any better than Mobarak and his friends. 

Now Mursi have proved he won’t make a good president. Basic human decency is to accept failure and loss. Before the scores of the elections came out, he went to Tahrir Square with his followers and protested. The scores didn’t even come out and he was saying that if he doesn’t win it means that the elections were invalid & corrupted, he said either myself or chaos. He started blaming the elections with rage & anger before he even knew who won. He accepted the Committee as judge and accepted their honesty when he was running for president, then he should not doubt their judgment and blame them for injustice. He should respect them especially that he bases his doubts on nothing but a fear to lose. That is just his latest. 

point is he sucks. he isn’t a better choice than Shafeeq cos they both suck big time. More people hate Shafeeq cos they link him to Mobarak’s reign and tyranny. but reality is they both are terrible.

sorry for the long post :P hope i made sense.. 

androphilia

androphilia:

Thousands of protesters are regrouping in central Cairo after day of clashes with security forces that left three dead.

By Malika Bilal

November 20, 2011

A stalemate has settled over the Egyptian capital’s Tahrir Square following a day of deadly clashes between security forces and protesters.

The square, which has been the scene of street battles between riot police and activists demanding an end to Egypt’s military leadership, was relatively calm on Sunday night after protesters regained control of the area and began calling for reinforcements.

Al Jazeera’s Sherine Tadros, reporting from Cairo, said all police and security forces had retreated from the square to side streets and roads in the surrounding the area.

Tadros estimated as many as 3,000 protesters had returned to the square just hours after being dispersed earlier in the day by riot police firing tear gas and rubber bullets.

Local doctors said three people were killed in the afternoon’s assault to evict the protesters who were calling on the ruling military to transfer of power to a civilian administration.

Protesters regroup

Despite the harsh crackdown, demonstrators were regrouping in the square as the night continued. Many were seen clutching gas masks, apparently anticipating further clashes with security forces in the hours, or days, to come.

“It is clear [the protesters] won’t leave and they are very much trying to keep police from re-entering the square,” Tadros said.

She continued: “There is concern that the military government has hijacked their revolution and [the country] has swapped one regime for another regime, and they want an end to that.”

Follow our coverage of the historic vote

Meanwhile, witnesses said skirmishes continued to erupt in the alleyways and side streets of Tahrir under the dense fog of tear gas.

The lull in violence in the main square came after police armed with batons and shields charged into the front lines of protesters who had been blockading the entrances to the square since Saturday.

Police fired rubber bullets and forcibly cleared the area in an assault that sparked panic among the estimated 5,000 protesters.

Mahmoud Said, a doctor at the nearby Munira hospital, told the Associated Press the bodies of two men were brought to the hospital on Sunday evening as a result of the crackdown. Mohammed Qenawy, a doctor at one of two field hospitals in the square, said a male protester in his early 20s also was killed.

A short time after the offensive, a surge of protesters returned to the square, overwhelming security forces and retaking the area.

Escalating violence

“This is what the Egyptian army calls protecting the revolution,” Salma Said, a democracy activist, told Al Jazeera. “We’ve lost so many people in the last nine months. We want [interim military leader] Field Marshall Tantawi gone. We’re going to keep fighting; we don’t have any other options.”

Before the protesters regrouped in the plaza, military police torched tents in the middle of the square, and witnesses reported security forces burning protesters’ motorcycles and other belongings.

As the events in Tahrir continued to unfold, Egypt’s Prime Minister Essam Sharaf and members of his government met the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. Details of their meeting, which followed crisis talks between Sharaf and his cabinet ministers, were not yet available.

Sunday’s violence followed a day of clashes in downtown Cairo and other major cities, with thousands of rock-throwing protesters demanding that the ruling military announce a date to hand over power to an elected government. At least two people were killed and hundreds wounded across the country on Saturday.

As Al Jazeera’s Tadros pointed out, the escalating violence comes just eight days before the country’s first national elections since Hosni Mubarak, the former president, was forced from power in February.

Even so, she said: “People here are not thinking about elections they are thinking about their revolution and how to finish it.”

Source: Al Jazeera and agencies

[Al Jazeera English Live | Youtube]
[Watch Now | Al Jazeera English]

come-start-a-revolution-deactiv
thesporkreport:

Little Arab Spring update
Syria - as the death toll continues to climb and the situation increasingly resembles a civil war the Arab League, who suspended Syria from their organisation this week, hope to send monitors to the country
Bahrain - despite violent crackdowns by authorities thousands once again take to the streets (pictured)
Egypt - Tahrir Square filled with chanting protesters calling for the military rulers to make way for a democratically elected civilian government
Libya - Saif al-Islam Qaddafi has been captured trying to flee Libya by anti-Qaddafi forces

thesporkreport:

Little Arab Spring update

Syria - as the death toll continues to climb and the situation increasingly resembles a civil war the Arab League, who suspended Syria from their organisation this week, hope to send monitors to the country

Bahrain - despite violent crackdowns by authorities thousands once again take to the streets (pictured)

Egypt - Tahrir Square filled with chanting protesters calling for the military rulers to make way for a democratically elected civilian government

Libya - Saif al-Islam Qaddafi has been captured trying to flee Libya by anti-Qaddafi forces

doufusion

doufusion:



today the central security forces “CSF” attacked the protesters in Tahrir square using tear gas and rubber bullets, so far 2 protesters have died in cairo, one in Alexandria and one in Suez, this ushers a new beginning to a new uprising, this time the Army Council must go “SCAF” they have…

moriahsbitch-deactivated2013042
thepoliticalnotebook:

Back to Tahrir. Protesters returned to the streets ahead of parliamentary elections and the ensuing violence is now in its second day. Police doused the crowds with tear gas, rubber bullets, and “birdshot” pellet cartridges and clashes erupted with protesters, including mutual stone-throwing. Two are dead and more than 600 have been injured so far.
Ursula Lindsey over at The Arabist writes:

These clashes feel almost unavoidable, given the military council’s terrible performance, the increasing vocal criticism it is facing, the rising tensions of all kinds surrounding the upcoming (poorly planned, utterly confusing) elections — given the terribly unclear transition process that has been put in place, and the fact that none of the revolution’s demands, including the reform of the security forces and real transitional justice, have been met.

Indeed, the transition has been going very poorly, with the Supreme Council of Armed Forces and the people increasingly at odds over lack of progress and the apparent moves of SCAF to gain political power. 
Above: A protester with the Egyptian flag. Photo Credit: Reuters. [Via.]

thepoliticalnotebook:

Back to Tahrir. Protesters returned to the streets ahead of parliamentary elections and the ensuing violence is now in its second day. Police doused the crowds with tear gas, rubber bullets, and “birdshot” pellet cartridges and clashes erupted with protesters, including mutual stone-throwing. Two are dead and more than 600 have been injured so far.

Ursula Lindsey over at The Arabist writes:

These clashes feel almost unavoidable, given the military council’s terrible performance, the increasing vocal criticism it is facing, the rising tensions of all kinds surrounding the upcoming (poorly planned, utterly confusing) elections — given the terribly unclear transition process that has been put in place, and the fact that none of the revolution’s demands, including the reform of the security forces and real transitional justice, have been met.

Indeed, the transition has been going very poorly, with the Supreme Council of Armed Forces and the people increasingly at odds over lack of progress and the apparent moves of SCAF to gain political power. 

Above: A protester with the Egyptian flag. Photo Credit: Reuters. [Via.]